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Aquaponics Explained

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#11 Paul

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 04:34 AM

I will make it a priority next visit.

 

I have to go to Phnom Penh next week. They are, apparently, making upgrades to the farm. Hopefully, We can drop by there. Will let you know what we learn.


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#12 andy

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 12:55 AM

Organic Aquaponics

Cultivating plants and fish through aquaponics is both easy on the environment and easy on finances. Aquaponic systems don't use any chemicals, and they require about 10 percent of the water used in regular farming. The systems are closed -- that is, once they've been filled with water, only a small amount is introduced into the system thereafter to replace evaporated water. But how can a water-based system use less water than conventional farming?

 

The answer is the continual reuse and recycling of water through naturally occurring biological processes. Basically, the waste from fish produces natural bacteria that converts waste like ammonia into nitrate. This nitrate is then absorbed by plants as a source of nutrients. The basic principle of aquaponics is to put waste to use.

Let's take a look at the step-by-step process:

•             Fish living in aquaponic tanks excrete waste and respirate ammonia into water. Ammonia is toxic to fish in high concentrations, so it has to be removed from the fish tanks for fish to remain healthy.

•             Ammonia-laden water is processed to harvest helpful types of bacteria such as Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter. Nitrosomonas turns ammonia into nitrite, while nitrobacter converts into nitrate. Both of these nitrates can be used as plant fertilizer.

•             Nitrate-rich water is introduced to the hydroponically grown plants (plants grown without soil). These plants are placed in beds that sit on tubs filled with water, and the water is enhanced by the nitrate harvested from the fish waste. The plants' bare roots hang through holes in the beds and dangle in the nutrient-laden water.

•             The roots of the plants absorb nitrates, which act as nutrient-rich plant food. These nitrates, which come from fish manure, algae and decomposing fish feed, would otherwise build up to toxic levels in the fish tanks and kill the fish. But instead, they serve as fertilizer for the plants.

•             The hydroponic plants' roots function as a biofilter -- they strip ammonia, nitrates, nitrites and phosphorus from the water. Then, that clean water is circulated back into the fish tanks.

Because fish waste is used as fertilizer, there's no need for chemical fertilizers. The money and energy it would take to put those chemicals to work is saved. In fact, the only conventional farming method that's used to operate an aquaponics system is feeding the fish.

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#13 andy

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 02:41 AM

What system to make and use?

 

There are so many different aquaponics systems and variations, as there are in hydroponics. It will be down to the needs what suit you! Costs and Size.

Paul recently mentioned to me a Barrel System. I think for SE Asia it is an excellent choice. Being available at low cost, and building to the size and requirement's you need.

 

 

 

I would also suggest the NFT (Nutrient film technique) System. This is a easy build, and understood system. It is also used in Cambodia. It can be used Hydroponically or Aquaponic.

 

 

Like both systems you can make to the size you need or require. Being for home use or commercial.

 

 

What is important is the delivery of water. The following video I like.

 

 

This Solar powered Pump would give you all the water cyclization you required. So now you would have a Organic and Green System.     


Edited by Paul, 31 January 2016 - 02:48 AM.

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#14 Paul

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 04:31 AM

The guy in the first video you posted, has a video regarding PH and trying to keep it between 6.5 and 7.5. His was staying around 8.2. He said he used some household vinegar to help it temporarily. He also tested the rocks to see if they were causing it to stay higher. 

 


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#15 Paul

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 02:13 AM

In this post I will try to answer questions if I can? Help with the best of my knowledge if possible.

 

Something came to mind that I may have just missed in one of your previous posts, Andy. 

 

Ph Levels? I guess I should make sure I have some of this on hand? 

 

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/ph-up-down


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#16 andy

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 03:00 AM

Paul like I have explained before! Aquaponics can be difficult to get the balance right (that is to suit the fish and plant variations). Hydroponics is cleaner and easier! But no FISH. The video you had Posted. 'Adding Vinegar'. This is a good method if you would like to eat pickled dead fish. If you don't want to use chemical additives, there are natural alternatives. I have used in the past, collective rain water and small amounts of limestone. also air stones do help.

Also better to test the water you are going to use on set up first.  


Edited by andy, 01 February 2016 - 03:01 AM.

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#17 Paul

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 04:50 AM

collective rain water

 

Rainwater would be used, exclusively, for this project. 


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#18 Kenny

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 09:30 AM

One of the main things to keep in mind with pH and fish is, NO fast changes.

 

in my quarantine rooms we were delivered fish from Singapore that started a 24 hour journey in a plastic bag full of soft water and pure oxygen and arrived in Australia in water that was so acid, it would strip the paint of a Ford.

 

We used phosphoric acid to bring aged OZ water up to the acidity of the water in the bags before slowly releasing the fish over a 15 minute period.

Phosphoric acid in water slowly dissipate over 6 or 12 hours thereby producing the slow pH change needed.


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#19 andy

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 05:12 AM

Kenny I think you will be very knowledgeable in the subject (uses and work at source, and know how of hydroponics). I agree with you fully, using slow changes in the power of hydrogen.

 

Polyphosphates are hydrolysed into simpler phosphates, which in moderate amounts are nutritious.

Phosphoric acid/phosphate solutions are, in general, non-toxic, mixtures of these types of phosphates are often used as buffering agents or to make buffer solutions, where the desired pH depends on the proportions of the phosphates in the mixtures.

Hydroponics systems you can freely adjust chemically. Any sudden changes to the Aquaponics systems are to be avoided where possible. To make fast changes will harm the fish and bio-filter.


Edited by andy, 02 February 2016 - 05:13 AM.


#20 Kenny

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 09:15 AM


Phosphoric acid/phosphate solutions are, in general, non-toxic

 

I hope so Andy, there's heaps in Coke and Pepsi.

 

The main advantage is the fact that it dissipates slowly allowing gradual pH change.

By the same token, if you want to acidify water permanently, it's not the best choice for the same reason.


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