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Give a calf, take a calf - end up with mama in the end.


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#1 Paul

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 09:16 AM

One of the cows just gave birth to a calf at the farm. So, we now have two calves. Only get to keep the first one, though. The one born in November. Here's why.

 

The first cow, and others at the farm, belong to us. All calves they birth will belong to us.

 

The second cow, however, belongs to someone else. This is some deal, from what I understand, where they allow a poorer farmer to look after the animal and to help them out. In this case, it is Chan's mom who is looking after the cow and any calves the cow produces.

 

The second cow will birth at least 3 calves, with the first and third going to the owner of the cow. The person looking after the cow, Chan's mama, pays all insemination fees. This will be about $10 USD, per calf to be born.

 

The first calf born belongs to whomever owns the cow. That calf milks for a year and is then weened. It is then turned over to the owners of the cow. The person then has the cow mated again.

 

The second calf belongs to the person looking after the cow. She can do as she wishes with the second calf - keep it, or sell it. This is repeated once again, with the third calf being turned over to the owner of the cow.

 

After this, the person looking after the cow is allowed to keep any further offspring from the cow, as well as the cow.

 

So, in short, someone gives a cow to a poorer farmer to look after. Two off spring, the first and third, are given to the owner. The farmer then gets a cow out of the deal.


Edited by Paul, 23 January 2017 - 07:18 AM.

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#2 syzmic

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 09:29 AM

Interesting arrangement.  Sounds like everybody involved is a winner...


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#3 andy

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 09:42 AM

This is some deal, from what I understand, where they allow a poorer farmer to look after the animal and to help them out


Whom made this deal?

#4 Paul

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 11:23 AM

Whom made this deal?

 

A local thing in the village that covers her farm, and others in the area.

 

Chan is explaining it a bit more to me, now. Apparently, if it is a young couple, physically fit to work, they would probably not offer this to them. This would be, primarily due to the fact that the man would be fit to work for a living to support his family.

 

But, say if it was a single / unwed / divorced mother, with children to attend to at home, they probably would do it for her. 

 

Something along the lines of a local benefit to disadvantaged people in the village?


Edited by Paul, 21 January 2017 - 11:30 AM.

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#5 andy

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 08:49 PM


A local thing in the village that covers her farm, and others in the area

 

The Khmers have practiced this method for years in Cambodia and neighbouring Country's. The owner gives consent of the cow to a lesser person than him or herself. There is a lot of trust given by the owner to the recipient. The owner has a long obligation for the cow! being that any illness are his responsibility. Vaccinations and the costs of the breeding of the animal. The recipient must agree to keep his upmost care for the cow, he or she can use the cow for work including cart and ploughing, milking, and use the cows waste for fertilization.



#6 Paul

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 10:45 PM

There is a lot of trust given by the owner to the recipient.

 

Must be a lot (trust), in this deal anyway. They have agreed to do this again, already. I'm going to see if they can find anyone else interested in starting this sort of deal with them. It is a hell of a lot cheaper than buying a cow and a calf, to help build the herd. Plus, ol' mama cow should be good for up to 10 offspring total, I think?


Edited by Paul, 22 January 2017 - 10:54 PM.

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#7 andy

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 12:29 AM

At two years of age the cow can calve. Then once every year. So it will depend on its lifespan to how many calves it will have.

#8 Paul

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 01:04 AM

At two years of age the cow can calve. Then once every year. So it will depend on its lifespan to how many calves it will have.

 

Yep. That's why I estimated up to 10 calves. Wouldn't matter to me either way, honestly. After the third calf is born, all the rest are freebies, basically. 


Edited by Paul, 23 January 2017 - 01:05 AM.

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#9 Bill H

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 11:34 AM

I wonder what the calf mortality rate is?  I question the calf every year thingy.  Well-run operations in the States NEVER experience 100% breeding success.  8-9 calves in ten years would be more realistic I think, but maybe things are different here.



#10 Paul

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Posted 27 January 2017 - 08:19 PM

I wonder what the calf mortality rate is? I question the calf every year thingy. Well-run operations in the States NEVER experience 100% breeding success. 8-9 calves in ten years would be more realistic I think, but maybe things are different here.


I have no idea. But I am guessing that it's pretty low. I see tons of young calves around the countryside.

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