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Parrothead

Var'ceen (វ៉ាក់សាំង) or VARK'SUNG

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Parrothead

Okay. So, I finally got hold of the vaccination for the birds I am now raising. But, first, we did drop by one place, and rang the other supplier, to ask if they had in fact vaccinated the birds prior to us receiving them. Both said they did. Maybe they did, maybe they didn't - I don't know for sure. However, there is NO doubt, I am talking zero doubt here, that they have not been vaccinated now. I know, because we did it today, for sure. 

 

The stuff comes in two bottles, kept refrigerated until mixed. Here is what you get when you buy the "Var'ceen (វ៉ាក់សាំង) or VARK'SUNG":

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One bottle is pure liquid. The other is some sort of crystals. Take a needle and plunger, stick it in the liquid bottle and fill the plunger. Take it out, inject it into the bottle of crystals and fill that bottle mostly full. Shake it until well mixed. Fill the plunger with the mixture, remove it from that bottle and inject, and fill the previous bottle (the one with all the liquid). Repeat until all the crystals have dissolved and have been mixed with the liquid, and have been transferred to the larger bottle with the liquid in it. Shake. 

 

Insert the little injector / dispenser thingy (the third item in the photo above). Grab one chick and hold it so it's head is turned with its eye facing you. Gently squeeze one drop into the bird's eye.

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Turn the bird's head (or its entire body) over and repeat. 

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Total cost for both items and the injector / dispenser thingy was 7,500r or just under $2.00 USD. This mixture will treat up to 100 birds to prevent Newcastle disease from being spread to them.

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Chit
jimmyboy

Now your cookin with gas!

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Parrothead

I just took some images of the little guys. Doesn't seem like giving them their inoculations affected their eating habits any! 

 

Before the food trays have been filled:

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After the food trays have been filled:

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Oops! Almost forgot. You may notice where we hung the waterers, well, three of them anyway, to help keep them cleaner. I still have the gravity feed system to work on, and other small projects. 

Edited by Paul

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Read2Learn

They are growing quickly, what happened to your favorite one?

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Parrothead

That would be number 20. It's still in there. You can't see the little thing, eh? 

 

You need to get your eyes checked. :D

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Parrothead

Update: I didn't read the label closely enough before, on the vial, prior to us administering the vaccinations. But, it was not only for Newcastle Disease. It also was for Infectious Bronchitis as well. Here is more information that I just came across. Part of I was given when I requested information on the BYC forum:

 

 

 

Newcastle disease

 

Chickens and turkeys can be immunized against Newcastle disease. Low-virulence live-virus vaccines are administered by a variety of routes such as drinking water, intraocular (eye drops), intranasal (nose drops), spray). Killed-virus oil emulsion vaccines are administered to pullets intramuscularly or subcutaneously as a final vaccine prior to the onset of egg production.
 
Chicks are often vaccinated at the hatchery against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis with a combination vaccine. Day-old poultry vaccinated for Newcastle disease can not be shipped through the mail.
 
The combination Newcastle-Infectious Bronchitis vaccine can also be given at 10-35 days. The vaccine can be administered via the drinking water, intraocular route or intranasal route. For breeder and layer flocks the vaccine needs to be repeated at 3-month intervals to maintain protective immunity. Alternatively, an inactivated vaccine can be given at the time of housing (18-20 weeks). Further vaccinations should not be required with this procedure. In breeder flocks, the high antibody level obtained by repeated vaccinations will assure transmission of a uniform parental immunity to offspring.
 
If you purchase pullets or mature chickens to add to your vaccinated flock, they can be vaccinated with Newcastle disease (B-1) vaccine via drinking water, intraocular or intranasal routes. The more reactive LaSota Newcastle disease vaccine is then given 4 weeks later.
 
Turkeys are often vaccinated against Newcastle disease at 4 weeks of age, and again when the breeders are housed.
 
 
Infectious bronchitis
 
Infectious bronchitis is primarily a respiratory disease of chickens.Modified live-virus vaccines (usually containing the Massachusetts serotype) are administered in young chickens. Vaccines are effective only if they contain the right serotype of virus for a given area. Do not vaccinate during an outbreak.
 
Infectious bronchitis is often combined with Newcastle vaccine in the same vial and given at the hatchery or at 10-35 days of age (see section on Newcastle disease).
 
Killed-virus vaccines (oil emulsion base) are also available. They are administered by injection (subcutaneous or intramuscular) to breeders from 14-18 weeks of age.

 

So, according to this, the flock is now protected against both Newcastle Disease and Infectious Bronchitis.

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jimmyboy

So this is why they say to repeat every 2 weeks?

 

"repeated vaccinations will assure transmission of a uniform parental immunity to offspring."

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Parrothead

Is that saying we would not have to immunize future generations of the flock? Or, would we still have to do that? The farm supply house DID suggest administering the vaccine every two weeks. Man, that is going to be a hell of a lot of work, to do that.

Edited by Paul

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dicey eye

Man, that is going to be a hell of a lot of work, to do that.

 

Looks like its more work than anticipated, no true?.

Edited by Paul
fixed quoted text

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Parrothead

Well, if we want the flock to be safe, want our investment protected as much as possible, then, yes it is going to take work. 

 

This entire project is a labor of love. Sitting outside  and watching the little guys in their coop is quite enjoyable. Sometimes, I lose track of time doing so.

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