Jump to content
Chit
andy

Bicycle for sale

Recommended Posts

andy

Bicycle for sale - Just as new condition $100

 

post-1230-0-84680800-1502174271_thumb.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chit
andy

Bicycle now sold to a good new owner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dante

Hi Andy, can I ask did you do much cycling around Koh Kong ? If so do you consider it dangerous regarding traffic and general  attitudes of motorists towards cyclists and general road conditions. Any info / advice appreciated. Thanks. 

Just asking on the off chance I bite the bullet and actually move over. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andy
22 hours ago, Dante said:

If so do you consider it dangerous

I think that it's best too consider all roads in Cambodia to be very dangerous. Although in Koh Kong there is little traffic. But in time like everywhere else it will change. Dante it's the fact that life is still very cheap in this country, also not many think of other road users. If you are on or in a smaller viehcal then the one coming straight at you, you need to get out of the way. It's the ones from the side streets you must look out for. You don't see the ones coming from behind, they tend to give you no room altogether. To be honest very few care for others on the roads, and the half of that crowd are just plain stupied, or just pissed.

Apart from that it's ok to ride a pushbike anywhere in the country from city and town's, past paddy rice field's, keeping lookout for the buffalo and dogs, possibly the odd viper if your unlucky, but then you maybe honered to see the odd bird or two that are quite rare at time's. Apart from the many mongrel and domestic cat, alongside the pleantiful town rat, not too much wildlife that people haven't already eaten or with illegal logging it's lost it's habitat. It could be down to a short lack of breath from the pleantiful burnings of roadside plastic waste fires, mostly in the chilled morning's air. There will have been many whom may have walked, peddled, rode and drove the roads you are asking about, are their surfaces smooth or rought, tarmaced or only dirt and dust.

Come, Dante take a look, for you won't be truely disappointed, or maybe you will, depending on how you wish to travel Cambodian highway roads. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dante

wow, thanks Andy for that detailed reply. You've certainly covered everything, and it gives me food for thought as to whether I'd take the risk. My problem would be I'd forget where I was while cycling and drop my guard...and pay the price. It seems what with all the dangers it wouldn't be a relaxing day out. 

In any event, thanks very much for the advice, I'll certainly take it onboard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dicey eye
20 hours ago, andy said:

To be honest very few care for others on the roads, and the half of that crowd are just plain stupied, or just pissed.

A teensy bit over stated.

Didn't know you had such a negative view of Khmers.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andy
16 hours ago, dicey eye said:

A teensy bit over stated.

 

So you do not agree with what you think is an overstatement of mine, it was bad before, and now it's so much worse with the Chinese drivers who are competing how many cars they can right off. Accidents and road deaths are very high in this country. I don't want to go down the list, your welcome to see it in the news yourself.

You give way here to the larger road user, but the few Khmer in the news of late have not got to grips with the trains of now. They are expecting the train to give way, and run away if they can. that is after the impact. Being what we are too, if your involved in any accident, you are to blame and will pay.

It is a fact I have wrote, according to police and news reports. I could have added 9 out of 10 heavy goods drivers who were recently stopped at police road blocks in Kampong Cham were tested positive for taking Yabba. Also don't forget about the youngsters on the 125cc who can't put both feet on the ground, also no number, no lights, the list goes on.

 

16 hours ago, dicey eye said:

Didn't know you had such a negative view of Khmers.

 

That's "A teensy bit over stated". You can read it how you wish. I am just putting down the facts about the road users in general. If you have had a different experience please write about it here. Regarding a negative view of Khmers! has road users I do! How many accidents have you seen, or even just read about. How many people do you know who have been involved in a accident here? Is a justifiable negative view I have. It is the same view as a Khmer has too.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dicey eye
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, andy said:

I am just putting down the facts about the road users in general.

Sure I read many,  many reports on traffic accidents. Though in my 11 years in Cambodia I haven't actually seen one happen. I've seen the aftermath of dented up vehicles, but not seen the accident with my own eyes.

From my first hand experience Khmer drives aren't as reckless as Honduran or Salvadoran drivers, (or Redneck good ole boys in the US driving looped down Texas back country roads shooting out road signs). Those guys were dangerous.

And in my 11 years in Cambodia have had one slight mishap (very slight) in the year I lived in Phnom Penh. None in SHV, none in Kampot, none in BTB and none in PoiPet.

Andy said one hour ago:

I could have added 9 out of 10 heavy goods drivers who were recently stopped at police road blocks in Kampong Cham were tested positive for taking Yabba.

I recently posted a report where the police tested 182 truck & bus drivers for drugs - only 8  were using.

So based on my personal experience your post is a teensy bit overstated.

Heck, I was involved in more accidents in the US than anywhere else.

PS: The mishap in Phnom Penh was due to a dog running in front of me and in trying to avoid hitting it, I dropped the motto

 

Edited by dicey eye

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andy
38 minutes ago, dicey eye said:

So based on my personal experience your post is a teensy bit overstated.

 

It maybe so, I was hopefully adding a little humour to the writing. It had been my experience around parts of my journeys. But I also look to fact, a young boy of 7 killed by a bus last week. The Khmer singer Kak Channthy, Cambodian Space Project  killed in Phnom Pehn. The young student girl "killed" hit and run. Westerner involved in a mishap accident with teenage girl, he had to pay her $200, Khmers on Facebook showed their discontent over extortion.

 

Road safety in Cambodia

 

The Global status report on road safety 2013 estimates that more than 2400 people are killed in road traffic crashes in Cambodia every year. Motorcyclists make up 70% of all these. Pedestrians are the second most vulnerable group, representing 12% of all road fatalities. Cambodia is one of the countries included in the Bloomberg Philanthropies Global Road Safety Programme which is being conducted over five years (2010-2014) by a consortium of international partners together with national governments and local organizations.

 

https://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_traffic/countrywork/khm/en/

 

Road travel

Cambodia has one of the highest rates of road traffic accidents in the region. There are high numbers of fatalities and serious injuries. In May 2017, a bus carrying tourists (including Britons) left the road and overturned near Poipet, in the north west of the country. Many accidents are due to poor vehicle and driver safety standards. Travel after dark significantly increases the risk of accidents.

You’ll need a Cambodian driving licence to drive a vehicle, including a motorcycle. If you have an International Driving Permit, you can apply for a Cambodian licence for US $32. Some local travel agencies can arrange this for a fee. Driving or riding a motorbike without a licence may invalidate your travel insurance in the event of an accident. Your vehicle may also be impounded.

Travelling as a passenger by motorcycle taxi (‘motodop’) is dangerous. Vehicles are poorly maintained and driving standards are low. There is also a risk of bag snatching, particularly in Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville.

The police can impose an on-the-spot fine if you ride a motorcycle without a helmet. Riding without a helmet may also invalidate your insurance. The police have also been known to stop tourists without Cambodian driving licences and advise them to return their motorcycles immediately. Sometimes a fine is imposed. In Sihanoukville, it’s a requirement for police to issue a receipt when issuing a fine for a traffic violation.

Before you hire a vehicle, check your travel insurance policy to ensure that you are covered (as either a driver or passenger for motorcycles) and check the small print of the rental agreement. Don’t use your passport as security for motorcycle or car rental. Owners have been known to hold on to passports against claimed damage to the motorcycle or scooter.

 

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/cambodia/safety-and-security

 

 

My friends were lucky to see Cambodian Space Project  on tour in the UK.

 

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andy

‘Action needed to stop road deaths doubling by next year’

image.png.d9800a0bec8dfbeb902db1e98e547491.png

Minister of Interior Sar Kheng has expressed concern over the rate of traffic accidents, saying the death toll will double by 2020 if no effective preventive measures were put in place. At least five people on average are killed on Cambodian roads every day.

The interior minister was speaking at the annual road safety meeting at the ministry on Friday.

 

Sar Kheng, who is chairman of the Road Safety Committee, stressed that the high rate of traffic accidents was the issue of most concern for Cambodians and that it required all relevant parties to implement effective preventive measures in order to ensure public safety.

“In Cambodia, according to the estimates of road safety experts, if there are no effective preventive measures brought in, the death toll from road accidents will climb to 3,200 a year by 2020. So we need to prevent such a situation in order to save the lives of Cambodians,” he said.

According to official statistics from the Traffic and Public Order Department at the National Police, at least 1,761 people were killed and 4,770 injured in road accidents last year.

Based on these figures, at least five people died every day on the roads. The provinces with the highest death tolls were Preah Sihanouk, Siem Reap, Kampong Thom and Phnom Penh.

At the meeting, Deputy Prime Minister Sar Kheng said that based on a World Health Organisation (WHO) report, road accidents are ninth on the list of accidental deaths, claiming the lives of around 1,250,000 people every year and injuring 50 million.

They cost the global economy billions of dollars annually.

Sar Kheng encouraged the rail and maritime transport sectors to take the burden off the Kingdom’s roads while urging all ministries and the institutions in charge of their construction to build roads to a high standard to cope with the increase in vehicles and ensure the number of accidents was kept to a minimum.

He said that effective instruction as to road safety was also necessary, suggesting officers in the armed forces educate their subordinates, teachers do so with their students and employers train their staff on the traffic law.

He appealed to motorcyclists to wear helmets properly and vehicle drivers to be extra cautious to minimise road accidents.

Ear Chariya, a senior official at the Road Safety Institute, could not be reached for comment on Sunday, but Nou Vattanak, a spokesman for the Ministry of Public Works and Transport, told The Post that it is currently developing dual carriageway roads with two lanes in each direction separated by a central reservation in order to cut down on congestion and road accidents.

He said the ministry is studying the expressway projects from Phnom Penh to Preah Sihanouk province to help reduce congestion and road accidents, while National Road 4 is being widened to become a four-lane highway with a high standard of safety measures installed, as are other main national roads.

“The ministry is putting in efforts to install high-standard road safety equipment [including surveillance cameras, traffic lights and signage, and road markings] in order to reduce road accidents by 50 per cent by 2020 and tackle congestion."

“We need time and the participation of all involved parties in respecting the traffic laws and not travelling in overloaded vehicles,” Vattanak said.

Kong Sovann, a technical adviser at the Ministry of Rural Development, told The Post on Sunday that over the past few years, the relevant ministries and institutions, including civil society organisations, have joined in efforts to improve the situation on the roads.

However, he said that most people had not changed their negative behaviour with law enforcement remaining limited.

“To be successful in reducing road accidents, together we all have to obey the law and change our behaviour and eliminate poor driving habits."

“Law enforcement bodies also need to fulfil their duties and obligations properly by issuing fines and punishing those who cause road accidents according to the law with transparency and ethics and without exception,” he said.

https://www.phnompenhpost.com/national/action-needed-stop-road-deaths-doubling-next-year

*According to official statistics from the Traffic and Public Order Department at the National Police, at least 1,761 people were killed and    4,770 injured in road accidents last year.

That is not a small figure at all.

This maybe interesting to some people -

Cambodian Land Traffic Law 

https://roadsafecambodia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/cambodia_traffic_law_2007.pdf

 

Eight out of 10 Cambodian coach drivers high on meth, says police chief

Road-side drug testing by Cambodian police has uncovered that eight in 10 night time coach drivers in the country’s Battambang province were high on methamphetamine.

Checkpoints were set up in the area in the north west of the country in response to a spike in deaths caused by road traffic accidents this summer. Since the beginning of August nearly 30 people died on the region's roads, a sharp increase on the 32 that died in the first seven months of the year.

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/cambodia/articles/eight-out-of-ten-cambodian-drivers-high-on-meth-says-police/

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites



  • If you would like to join to begin posting and become an active member, feel free to click on THIS LINK, to register. If you have any questions, feel free to post them in the Forum Operations / Issues forum. If you register, but then are unable to log in, please feel free to post concerns in the Having Problems Logging In? forum. We will address any and all questions, comments, or concerns, as quickly as possible. Welcome to the Living In Cambodia Forums! 

    Welcome to the forum!

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use & Guidelines. Here is our Privacy Policy.