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Parrothead

Boy! Did WE time it right! "No more long term visas..."

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Parrothead

In the news today, notice of no more long term (EB) "Ordinary / Business" visas to be issued, without work permits. 
 

It just so happens that we sent my passport to Immigration on last Monday, August 15th, to convert my visa to a retirement visa. I enclosed all necessary requirements, in order to convert it.

 

Without Business Permit, Foreigners Will Be Denied Long-Term Visa
BY JANELLE RETKA | AUGUST 25, 2017
 
News circulated on Thursday that foreigners without work permits would no longer be eligible for long-term visas after the turn of the month, a significant change in policy that could not be confirmed with immigration officials.
 
“As of Sept. 1 no long term visas will be issued to foreigners without work permits,” a post to the Facebook page of the Overseas Press Club of Cambodia said on Thursday. “If freelancers can apply today or tomorrow they will need to give the address of their Cambodian employer.”
 
Another Facebook page for Palm Tours and Travel, based in Phnom Penh, echoed the need for a permit, with a post stating: “6 Months and and 12 Months Cambodia visa extension need work permit or work certificate to apply.”
 
A discussion on popular forum Khmer440 also discussed the potential to continue living in Cambodia without a work permit, renewing short-term visas regularly. But visa and travel agents in the capital appeared to be unaware of any changes to the visa rules, long considered among the most lax in Asia. Various Phnom Penh-based companies said they were unaware of any new regulations, stating that only a passport and fees were required to obtain the long-term visas.
 
Labor Ministry and immigration officials could not be reached for comment, while Ministry of Interior spokesman Khieu Sopheak declined to comment.
 
But Anthony Galliano, director of Cambodian Investment Management, said he had reason to believe the changes were coming.
 
“From our sources at the Ministry of Labor and Vocational Training we [believe] there is substantiation to the statement that long-term business (E) visas will not be granted without work permits,” he said in an email.
 
“The greatest impact is likely to be on foreign owned small businesses who have resisted in getting their workers permits, due to cost, freelancers, transitory workers who frequently change jobs, and those foreigners who stay in the country but don’t actually work.”
 
An “abundance of opportunities, notifications, and announcements” by the Labor Ministry have encouraged compliance, he added. “[T]he fact that we have reached this stage is no surprise, and realistically aligns Cambodia with its Asian neighbors in terms of labor law conformity.”
 
 
© 2017, The Cambodia Daily. All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced in print, electronically, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without written permission.
 

SOURCE

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andy

 

 


It just so happens that we sent my passport to Immigration on last Monday, August 14th, to convert my visa to a retirement visa. I enclosed all necessary requirements, in order to convert it.

 

What paperwork did you need to supply to support you needing a retirement visa?

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Parrothead

What paperwork did you need to supply to support you needing a retirement visa?

 

The lady asked me to send my current and previous passports, proof of retirement income, and two passport sized photos, Andy.

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andy

The lady asked me to send my current and previous passports, proof of retirement income, and two passport sized photos, Andy.

 

What was the reason for wanting the previous passports? I am curious about this.

I myself are thinking about the ER retirement visa.

With recently weighing up the difference, between the possibilities of the so called business visa with continuing work permits.

It was actually suggested  to me buy immigration as an option for long stay in the Kingdom. At the time the official age to obtain this type of visa is 60 years old (but still no legal documentation of this). But that is by the way in yours and my situation being under the age bracket. But like you have quoted, having a official proof of obtaining a pension income from your own country, is a requirement only needed.

The costs are the same price for the two visas, so no problems there.

Of course with the business visa you are able to work, that is if it is supported every year with a work permit, at the yearly cost of $100 plus medical and certificate at $15. But then again with business you are liable for tax of around about 5%. That also depends on earnings, if any at all.

 

Then again I have also been told rumors that the work permit could be priced at $600 shortly.

The other drawback is also what happened with the people obtaining there first work permits, is that they had to pay for all the years they did not have one, co-inside with how many so called business visas were in there passports. I do know of a few people here whom have back-paid on up to a five year period, at the cost of $125 per year. That is with immigration looking at the visas in the passports.  

 

With the retirement visa you are not allowed to work. So in my case I would have to put all the documentation in my lady's name and stay on the other side of the bar, has I was myself a paying customer. If I was to be seen has I was doing any kind of work I would be fined, or at worst be told I was holding the wrong kind of visa for my stay.

But most of all holding the retirement visa, has its drawbacks in that you are officially declaring your income. And by the laws of the country, being a resident with incoming overseas income I would be liable to pay up to 20% of that in taxes in Cambodia.

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Parrothead

What was the reason for wanting the previous passports? I am curious about this.

 

No idea, aside from Immigration wanting to see all the stamps in my passports. I automatically send all travel documents anyway, unless they specifically instruct me not to do so.

 

 

At the time the official age to obtain this type of visa is 60 years old (but still no legal documentation of this). But that is by the way in yours and my situation being under the age bracket.

 

I have not read, in any documentation so far, where there was a requirement of any particular age to secure an ER visa. When Chan told her I was 51, nothing was mentioned about me being too young, or ineligible in any way, for the visa.

 

 

With the retirement visa you are not allowed to work.

 

Exactly the reason I want one. I do not wish to work here, in any capacity.

 

 

But most of all holding the retirement visa, has its drawbacks in that you are officially declaring your income. And by the laws of the country, being a resident with incoming overseas income I would be liable to pay up to 20% of that in taxes in Cambodia.

 

Who told you this? Did they show you proof of this? I have never been required to pay one cent of my income, in taxes to the foreign nation where I resided.

 

Here is the document showing Khmer visas.

Sub-decree on visa types_Eng.pdf

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JohnOBohn

My visa was converted to the retirement visa Aug 5, this year.   Did not even ask for it & submitted NO documents/info at all other than the normal passport/one photo & $290.   Good for 12 months.  Have never heard of Cambodia taxing foreigners out of country income.

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andy

 

 


No idea, aside from Immigration wanting to see all the stamps in my passports. I automatically send all travel documents anyway, unless they specifically instruct me not to do so

 

It is usual to send your current passport to renew the visa. EB or ER. But now applying for the EB (1st September) you must hold a valid work permit.

I have read recently people being asked to get an official government letter from their countries Embassy to back up their claim for their ER visa.

 

 

 


I have not read, in any documentation so far, where there was a requirement of any particular age, to secure an ER visa. When Chan told her I was 51, nothing was mentioned about me being too young, or ineligible in any way, for the visa.

 

I had been told by immigration when they visited me the age was 60 or 55 if you had official proof of retirement income. But who knows this is Cambodia :) It may take them years to put things in place! Just like the work permit. But even so I know many people here who have had to back pay for the years they had not held the work permit. And if they did not pay they were threatened with a fine of $1000 to pay in person in PP.

 

 

 


Exactly the reason I want one. I do not wish to work here, in any capacity.

 

Well that is obvious. You are not allowed to work with the ER visa. Like I say, I too am looking into this option after recent talks and advice from immigration officers. But this leaves me with nothing, all in the girls name just as I was before in Thailand.

 

 

 


Who told you this? Did they show you proof of this? I have never been required to pay one cent of my income, in taxes to the foreign nation where I resided.

 

I had read this somewhere on the internet (try looking it up). Plus my friend who obtained his ER visa makes a point of leaving the country for spells. Trying not to become a sole resident of Cambodia and be eligible to pay tax in the country.

Also for my nationality and some others. To receive the full pension they have to remain a resident of their own country. For example a British resident up to now is allowed in EU country's. If to be elsewhere such as Cambodia, his or her pension will be taxed at source in their own country at 25%. And with the Cambodian tax laws on residency I would not like to have to pay double tax.

 

The other thing with the PDF you have posted, the last entry was 2015. Now out of date since new changers are coming into force.    

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andy

My visa was converted to the retirement visa Aug 5, this year.   Did not even ask for it & submitted NO documents/info at all other than the normal passport/one photo & $290.   Good for 12 months.  Have never heard of Cambodia taxing foreigners out of country income.

 

That is good to know. Serves my purpose. But time will tell. 

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Parrothead

My visa was converted to the retirement visa Aug 5, this year.   Did not even ask for it & submitted NO documents/info at all other than the normal passport/one photo & $290.   Good for 12 months.  Have never heard of Cambodia taxing foreigners out of country income.

 

In your case, they figured you were far too old, to be part of the work force. :D

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andy

Work Permits Required For Long-term Visa Extensions

25/08/2017
13429

Police officials at the Department of Immigration (part of the Ministry of Interior), which is located opposite the Phnom Penh International Airport and deals with visa extensions for foreigners, have confirmed that it will become compulsory for all foreign nationals to obtain an official work permit/employment card to be eligible to apply for a long-term extension to their ordinary “business†visa (also known as an EB visa).

 

These new rules are to come into effect from Monday 4 September, and will only apply to six-month and one-year visa extensions. Three-month EB visas for Cambodia can be obtained without a work permit/employment card, and extended indefinitely, but are only single entry compared to the multiple entry six-month and one-year EB visas.

All new foreign arrivals to Cambodia must purchase a one-month E-class visa, priced at $35 – not a tourist (T) visa – to be eligible for an EB extension. Currently, a one-month EB extension costs $50, three months is $80, six months is $160, and one year is $290 when purchased through an agent.

Work Permit applications

A work permit/employment card, which are two separate documents but can be applied for at the same time and considered as one application, costs $100 per year. Applications must be made online via the Ministry of Labour’s Foreign Workers Centralized Management System, which has been outsourced to a private company called E-Solutions (Cambodia) Co. Ltd. The fee to E-Solutions for the visa application process is $33. Applicants must have also undertaken a straight-forward health check at the Ministry, which costs $25. You can pay $60 to an agent to get your health certificate without going to the Ministry.

The online system has received substantial criticism, especially from foreigners frustrated with having their applications refused. Many of these are either self-employed or freelancing, although it is technically possible to successfully obtain a work permit/employment card for these types of workers. Individuals can get help with the application process from agents such as ‘Call Kim’ (chornkimhoun@yahoo.com or 092 256 388), who charges a fee per application which varies on a case-by-case basis.

For foreigners currently living and working in Cambodia without a valid work permit/employment card, there are still ways to obtain an EB visa extension.

Immigration officials say they will accept an official letter from the individual’s employer guaranteeing that a work permit/employment card will eventually be arranged for the employee to cover 2017. Should immigration officials catch the individual without such documentation in 2018, their employers will be held responsible for paying late fees, which are reportedly set at $10 per day.

Retirement/Student Visas

Meanwhile, the Immigration Department has revealed two new types of visa – retirement visas (ER) and student visas (ES). The prices for these visas will match those for the EB visas, ie. $160 for six months and $290 for one year.

While the ES visa requires an official letter from the student’s educational institute confirming their enrolment, the ER requires absolutely no documentation from the retiree. However, if immigration officials catch an ER holder working in Cambodia, considerable fines and potentially jail time and deportation are to be imposed.

Non-working spouses can also apply for EB visas, but must provide a letter from the company employing their partner confirming their status in Cambodia in their visa application.

It is advised to foreign workers in Cambodia to keep a copy of their work permit/employment card on their person at all times.

Renewal period

The official period for renewal of a work permit/employment card is between January and March each year, although the Ministry of Labour has yet to confirm the exact details surrounding late payments. Much confusion arose from the Ministry’s new work permits applications initiative earlier this year, which saw an amnesty of retroactive fees applied to previous years working in Cambodia ($100 per year) granted for the entire month of April. This naturally angered those that had paid these fees on time before the end of March. There is no indication that another amnesty of retroactive fees will be granted again.

Companies must submit their Foreign Worker Quota Requests to the Ministry of Labour between September and November each year.

 

B2B Cambodia.

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