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Parrothead

Rice Harvest: It's that time of the year, again.

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Bill H

That said, I think a 6" well with a good pump (if the draw isn't too deep) will really help all your farming efforts.  Best of luck to ya' on that as well.

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andy

No. We grossed: $503.00

We paid out this: $254.30

That left us this:  $248.70

Ok now I understand. Not easy working out your way of calculating.

So the profit is $248.70. But if you had paid for seed $150 the profit would have been $98.70 

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Parrothead

 

 

So the profit is $248.70. But if you had paid for seed $150 the profit would have been $98.70

 

Well, it would have been about the same. We kept 6 sacks, each sack between 90 kgs and 100 kgs, that we would have sold rather than given to her family to replace what they gave us. So, for arguments sake, lets say each of those 6 sacks were 95 kgs. We would have been paid an additional $145.38, by the buyer.

 

95 (kgs per sack) X .255 (rate paid to us per kg) =  $24.23

$24.23 (total per sack) X 6 sacks = $145.38

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Oz Jon

Well, it seems that Chan is right - a much drier land crop is a better way to go.

 

Rice growing seems like a pretty poor return on investment in time, money and land area.

 

If you are going to farm, It seems you need to find something with a higher value per ton, per hectare and per manhour.

 

Marijuana immediately comes to mind! - (just for the hemp fibre content, of course) - Lol!

 

Maybe some up-market produce to sell to hotels, etc - selling based on quality and reliability? (if anyone cares about either of those things in Cambodia?)

Edited by Oz Jon
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andy

Well, it seems that Chan is right - a much drier land crop is a better way to go.

 

But there is so much rain here.

 

Rice growing seems like a pretty poor return on investment in time, money and land area.

 

Cambodia's rice export is worth $305.9 million per year.

 

If you are going to farm, It seems you need to find something with a higher value per ton, per hectare and per manhour.

 

One of the biggest problems is the soil content.

 

Marijuana immediately comes to mind! - (just for the hemp fibre content, of course) - Lol!

 

Hydro and Aquaponics. Drug enforcement is now into its second year. Lots of crop burning. 

 

Maybe some up-market produce to sell to hotels, etc - selling based on quality and reliability? (if anyone cares about either of those things in Cambodia?)

 

Problem is the up-markets don't want to pay the price. The big people will also want their cut if you start to make money.
Better to keep the peasant farmer suppressed, enabling the big land owners and leading marketers to make the money.
Don't step on the elite. Not without a WP.  :)
Edited by Paul
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Parrothead

If you are going to farm, It seems you need to find something with a higher value per ton, per hectare and per manhour.

 

Oh, if we wanted to make money, just grow herbs, like basil. I have restaurants asking me to grow that, and others for them to buy. And, I wouldn't need to plant anywhere near a hectare.

Edited by Paul

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mollydooker

Be sure to ask Herb first !! ....hahaha ...

 

Seriously ...what about some kind of nut ...macademia makes great money I believe ...

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Parrothead

 

 

Seriously ...what about some kind of nut ...macademia makes great money I believe ...

 

No idea. I know there seems to be enough nuts here already, though. :D 

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Bill H

Nuts are a great crop with high profit, the problem is the time it takes the tree to produce once it's planted.  You measure that time in years, so you need capital to sustain yourself and the costs associated with the trees after they are planted.  If you put a drip irrigation system in the water usage really falls, which is why nearly all of California fruit and nut orchards have been converted and in this area, they are starting to convert the thousands of acres of Pecan and Pistachio nuts to a drip system.

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Parrothead

Nuts are a great crop with high profit, the problem is the time it takes the tree to produce once it's planted.  You measure that time in years, so you need capital to sustain yourself and the costs associated with the trees after they are planted.  If you put a drip irrigation system in the water usage really falls, which is why nearly all of California fruit and nut orchards have been converted and in this area, they are starting to convert the thousands of acres of Pecan and Pistachio nuts to a drip system.

 

Well, like I stated, we are planning on having a 15 cm (6") bore drilled sometime after the first of the year. We could definitely go with a drip system. Would just install an 8,000 - 10,000 liters water tank for back up water for the crops / trees. I guess we need to just see what we could plant there. 

 

I like Mangoes. I think they take about 5 years to mature, though, if not mistaken?

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