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Parrothead

Back in June, I created a thread regarding the installation of an electrified perimeter fencing around the farm. The primary reason is to keep goats, and maybe some pigs, contained within a given area. A secondary reason is to keep predators (the two-legged kind) off the property.  We are going to start by fencing in an initial area for the livestock.

 

This plan calls for 66 vertical posts, 5 strands of wire (3 hot, 2 ground), and 330 insulators. The initial plan is to run two ground wires, alternating between three hot wires, to guarantee proper conductivity of the electric signal during dry season. I will add a additional ground rods along the fence, as well.

 

Electric_Fence_Layout.gif

 

The initial area to fence in will be a bit over a half acre, or ~2,100 square meters.

 

electric_fence_area.png

 

As time goes on, we will expand this area. Anyway, on to the main point of this post.

 

Earlier this month, we were in the city to pay rent, bills, and to buy groceries for the month. While there, I met up with my friend Pete, who was able to get the fence charger I have been trying to locate for a while. If it isn't 20,000 volts, it's damned close. I tested it and it will create one heck of a spark. I know I wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of its bite. 

 

Anyway, thanks to Pete, for being able to locate the charger for me. We are one step closer to getting goats (and, hopefully, pigs). 

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John_Galt

Going to get that same electrician who cut the wire you specifically told him not to cut to install the fence for you? :rofl:

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Parrothead
35 minutes ago, John_Galt said:

Going to get that same electrician who cut the wire you specifically told him not to cut to install the fence for you? :rofl:

 

Don't think so. He knows he isn't welcome here any longer. 

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mollydooker

He would be in for a shock if you hired him again !!      :crack-up:

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andy

Paul you asked me about Electric fence insulators. My friend uses this method, tried and tested over many years on 13 hectors of land.

IMG-20180925-WA0002.thumb.jpg.4e1648949cde7e83199b82b1f9fb65fe.jpg 

 

Another thing about goats Paul to be aware of is their coats are very good insulators too.

 

IMG-20180925-WA0001.thumb.jpg.8ff2fca9d7518969071161a28b854e77.jpg   

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Parrothead
1 hour ago, andy said:

Another thing about goats Paul to be aware of is their coats are very good insulators too.

 

First, I really appreciate the images - very much in fact. That is definitely something I could look at doing.

 

It looks like the PVC pipe may be cut to about 7 or 8 centimeters? This would definitely be cheaper than putting up wooden poles at $6 - $6.50 each, and paying $107 USD for the 400 insulators I have been looking to order. Did he give you specific thickness of the rebar and size of the PVC pipe, by chance?


That is a really good idea, from what I can see.

 

Regarding their coats, I was thinking about that, as well. But, most fence chargers I have seen, have been no more than 4,000 or 5,000 volts. This one is 20,000 volts. It may give them a bit more run for their money, and their thicker coats.

 

We are going to look at some goats soon, to get an idea of what type of goats, and how many we may want. I will have a look at how the guys have theirs fenced in, while we are visiting both farms. 

 

 

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Parrothead

Ya know, @andy, the more I think about it, the more I believe that would work out pretty well. Rebar happens to come in 12 meter lengths. I would need 12 pieces to cover 200 meters. We could cut them into 6 - 2 meter lengths.

 

Then, we could shove each length 70 cm deep into the ground. That leaves 130 cm above ground, or just over 51", which was just about my initial idea for post height, above. Maybe that would work pretty well for the goats (and possibly some pigs).

 

PVC comes in 4 meters lengths. Divide that into 8 cm lengths, would give me 50 pieces per length of PVC. 8 lengths of PVC is what I would need.

 

I am not sure what size rolls they come in. But, 5 wire lengths of 200 meters each, is 1000 meters of fence wire.

 

I try to see what current prices are for PVC, wire and rebar, as soon as these rains stop long enough for me to get out of here.

 

 

 

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andy
4 hours ago, Parrothead said:

have been no more than 4,000 or 5,000 volts. This one is 20,000 volts. It may give them a bit more run for their money,

 

You will find the lower voltage are crap. The norm is like you have at 20,000.

I have no measurement's and do apologise for the lack of info, just at the moment I am tied up with Nak's health issues. 

Like I say this method is tried and tested over many years, also it's solar. And the solar energy also draws the water from the well with ease.

Look in to the goats! I had been down to Kompang spu looking at some, boar goats are the ones here Paul, and they are well suited. Don't forget I want one male and nine females :) no joke ok.

 

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andy

If you also remember from the original post. Regarding the fence posts. These in the photo you can concrete in permanent.

That's up to you.

el1Capture.PNG.59bb2198b50a444ef79e28a543a91dbc.PNG

Using the rebar, again up to you. In this case its moveable and used as a divider, temporary and ideal due to the rebar carrying weight.

IMG-20180925-WA0001.thumb.jpg.8ff2fca9d7518969071161a28b854e77.jpg

 

This can be hammered to what depth you require into the ground. Up to a metre not much will move the fence out of position.

But can be moved if required to do so. 

 

 

   

 

 

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Parrothead
12 hours ago, andy said:

I have no measurement's and do apologise for the lack of info, just at the moment I am tied up with Nak's health issues.

 

It's all good. You have helped me, probably more than you may realize. You may also have just saved me a considerable amount of money. The wooden posts would have been about $450 USD. The insulators another $150, by the time I had them in my hands. So, thanks again, for your assistance in this.

 

12 hours ago, andy said:

You will find the lower voltage are crap. The norm is like you have at 20,000.

 

I have no idea, honestly, since this is my first electric fence charger, ever. But, I still have not found a line voltage tester, aside from the one that came with the charger, that will measure anything over 10,000 volts. It seems that most chargers are considerably less than this one. But, I have a feeling 20,000 volts is what the doctor ordered, for hard headed livestock, such as goats and pigs seem to be.

 

Here is one graphic I went by, to determine what voltages are suggested for given livestock:

VoltageMinimumLrg.png

 

12 hours ago, andy said:

Like I say this method is tried and tested over many years, also it's solar. And the solar energy also draws the water from the well with ease.

 

That's one thing I like about this charger, I can power it from mains or 12 vdc (solar charged). I can easily add a relay that will switch from mains to solar power, in the event of a mains power interruption. (The night before last, we had a 4.5 hours mains power cut. The longest that has occurred here since we installed mains power on site.) 


O/T Side Note: If you have a well, or a pond to aerate, it is easy to run a solar powered pump. I need to get around to drilling a well or two on the property, honestly. One AC powered; the other DC (solar) powered.

 

12 hours ago, andy said:

Look in to the goats! I had been down to Kompang spu looking at some, boar goats are the ones here Paul, and they are well suited. Don't forget I want one male and nine females :) no joke ok.

 

As soon as we can get to both locations (possibly even today, if my friend is home), I will give you a report, with photos and video, regarding the goats, price, etc.

 

 

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    • Parrothead
      By Parrothead
      One of the types of animals we wish to get in the fairly near future, are goats. (They currently run about $5.00 US / kilogram, by the way.) However, goats are known to be escape artists, from what others tell me. (Pigs too, from what I understand?) 
       
      Anyway, one way to keep goats penned in, is by adding electric fencing around the perimeter of the land, where you wish them to remain.
       
      It so happens that a buddy of mine out this way (about another 20 Kilometers past the farm), sells electric fence chargers made in Thailand. I believe they run about $40 US, each? (Don't hold me to that, but I believe that is the cost?) Nothing pretty to look at, from what I can tell. But, they can be powered by either 12 vdc, or 230 vac. They apparently produce one heck of a spark, as well. So, they are not lightweight models. And, you can increase or decrease the energizing cycles. Higher rates for stubborn or larger animals, I suppose? 
       
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      Download This Write Up
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